World Mental Health Day

It was World Mental Heath Day yesterday and so I heard and read lots of focus on mental health and suicide prevention throughout the day. The statistics are that one in four of us with struggle with our own mental health at some point during our lives and I am certainly open about being one of that 25%. I have cyclical periods of feeling low, when I lack in confidence, energy and motivation – the last ‘low’ lasted for almost two years. Then some trigger, often something when I focus on someone else rather than myself, brings me back up and then I have boundless energy, bright ideas and plans and I feel as though anything is possible. I know that neither state is’normal’, but the highs are certainly a lot more fun than the lows.

Due to my issues with my own mental health, I believe that I can identify a fellow-sufferer as, although the symptoms can be varied and how it manifests itself, many of the tell-tale signs are similar and familiar. Thankfully, we are encouraged to talk more openly about mental health these days but there is still a taboo and a mystery about it. In my own small way to encourage the start of that conversation, I held a ‘Mental Health of Carers’ session at Joshua’s school last term and we have another one planned in for next month. A small group attended and I am hopeful that more may follow for the second session, if word gets out.

If the national statistic is 1 in 4, then the incidence amongst parents/carers of special needs children must be significantly higher : that isolation, the need to fight for services , the lack of sleep and the disappointment that things are not as you had hoped, will all contribute to high levels of anxiety and depression, I have no doubt. At our last session, we laughed when we compared the creative outlets that we each use as coping mechanisms : while I bake and write as therapy, another mum uses music to calm her and another adopts cleaning or decorating  – I was eager to swap with her and offered to bake for her family , if she would paint our house!

I do not have any answers for any of my fellow sufferers, but I can talk willingly and openly about what helps me or how I feel. If nothing else, it should encourage sufferers to feel less isolated. I believe that half the battle is to begin that conversation, then who knows where it might lead…..